Aleppo

All posts tagged Aleppo

Noor's Father. Douma. 2016 AFP/Abd Doumany

Aleppo Weekly – August 11-September 1

by The Aleppo Project on September 1, 2016

“Do certain images of injured kids stay in my mind more than others? If you asked me that two years ago, then I could probably give an answer. But today, after witnessing the huge number of massacres that I have, it’s very hard to think of one specific instance. It’s become a daily occurrence. Now images stay in my mind for a short while before they slip away, to take their place alongside all the others. My own personal graveyard.” AFP Photographer Abd Doumany

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The Aleppo ProjectAleppo Weekly – August 11-September 1
Ahmad al-Sawas, former Syrian National Gymnastics Champion. March 2016. Bustan al-Qasr, Aleppo. Photo: Reuters/ Abdalrhman Ismail.

The Aleppo Weekly – July 29-August 10

by The Aleppo Project on August 10, 2016

Aleppian Ahmad al-Sawas, Syria’s national gymnastics champion when fighting broke out, did not compete at the Rio Olympics. Read his story here.

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The Aleppo ProjectThe Aleppo Weekly – July 29-August 10
Castello Road. Late June 2016. Photo: Dr. Zaher Sahloul/LA Times

Aleppo Under Siege

by The Aleppo Project on July 19, 2016

We now know the pattern of besiegement in Syria and so we know what is to come in Aleppo. Government forces surround an area of a city and cut off all food and supplies. The population weakens and thins, the elderly dying first and then next the children, often from water-borne diseases. The United Nations stands by, failing again in its humanitarian obligations through its obsequiousness to a government whose crimes long ago stripped it of any legitimacy. The West and Russia can drop bombs but not food. Support cannot go to those who might be able to break the siege because of their ideology; instead it just sloshes into a corrupt morass outside the country. Statements are issued and ignored. 2139. 2165. 2191. 2254. 2258. These are the numbers of the United Nations Security Council resolutions that are brushed off by Assad.

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The Aleppo ProjectAleppo Under Siege
Leen Darwish developed an Arabic-language coding app. Photo: UNFPA Syria/Ghassan Ahmad.

The Aleppo Weekly- June 28-July 5

by The Aleppo Project on July 7, 2016

“Big businesses are closing and the problems we are facing only young people can solve…The need for startups and entrepreneurship culture is really essential for Syria.” Leen Darwish. Read about her coding app Remmaz here.

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The Aleppo ProjectThe Aleppo Weekly- June 28-July 5

Dar Janbolad – Aleppo’s Finest Palace

by Tiffany Ftaimi on July 6, 2016

When I lived in Syria, I hadn’t even heard about the Janbolad (Junblatt) Palace until 2011, my third year as an archaeology student. I was very surprised that a palace like this existed in my city. I did not expect its beauty, because just a few people even knew the palace’s name and location.

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Tiffany FtaimiDar Janbolad – Aleppo’s Finest Palace

Impact of the Civil War on Aleppo’s Job Market

by Karam Shaar on June 23, 2016

Studies of the Syrian civil war have largely focused on topics such as refugees and casualties and have left the crucial topic of employment greatly under-researched. Understanding changes in the composition of the job market will greatly enhance reconstruction efforts in post-war Aleppo as it allows a better understanding of the availability and quality of the labour force.

In late 2014 and early 2015, The Aleppo Project surveyed 1001 Aleppians about many issues.

This paper focuses on the two questionnaire items related to current professions of the respondents and their previous professions. The major findings of this paper include:

  • The composition of the job market has pointedly changed due to the conflict
  • Unemployment more than doubled due to the conflict. This applies to Aleppians within the city and abroad
  • Differences in the rate of unemployment among Aleppians are largely explained by gender, age, education, and the neighbourhood from which the respondents come.

I believe that policymakers in post-war Aleppo will be faced with very high unemployment rates as the returnees with the fewest economic opportunities abroad come to Aleppo first to seek jobs. Ignoring the unemployed might ignite new unrest and could make the process of reintegration and reconciliation harder.

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Karam ShaarImpact of the Civil War on Aleppo’s Job Market